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Canadian Ozone Network Faces Axe

Canadian Ozone Network Faces Axe

Canadian ozone network faces axe : Nature News.

Canadian environmental research has already been hit hard by the looming closure of the Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences, which provides the majority of funds for climate and atmospheric science in the country. The charitable foundation has received no federal funding since 2003, and is expected to close next year.

 

“The funding crisis in this country is really hammering our ability to observe and protect the environment of Canada,” says Duck. “I have already lost most of my group because I just can’t pay them any more. If help doesn’t come soon, many others will shut up shop.”

In response to the funding issues, Environment Canada, the Canadian version of the EPA, is looking to cut the ozone monitoring program.

Its network of monitoring stations provides about one-third of the Arctic’s ozone measurements and this year contributed key data showing unprecedented depletion of stratospheric ozone over the Arctic. With regular in situ measurements going back to 1966, Canada also holds the longest-running record of atmospheric ozone levels in the world — an archive that is also threatened.

These funding cuts could possibly be damaging to our ability to obtain necessary date to evaluate man made climate change:

“Canada has been a linchpin of Arctic ozone observation,” says Neil Harris, an atmospheric chemist at the University of Cambridge, UK, who heads the European Ozone Research Coordinating Unit. “It has contributed very substantial data to research that allows us to be diagnostic about what’s happening in the Arctic stratosphere. If we were to lose one-third of our monitoring capability in the Arctic the overall loss in scientific value will be much greater.”

BryanF- I understand that in these difficult economic times priorities need to be evaluated and funded first.  However, to me it seems that we need to keep an eye on the future as well, and make sure that we don’t shirk the future in order to make today easier.  Removing 33% of the arctic’s atmospheric monitoring stations seems to be a devastating and unnecessary step.

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